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Aphors Edit

1. The blind girl’s teacher prepared to sit down. He did this by lolling the rice paper cylinder with his tongue. First, he touched the bottom of it with his tongue. Second, he touched the top-left of it with his tongue. Third, he touched the top-right of it with his tongue. In this way, the blind girl’s teacher prepared to sit down by lolling the rice paper cylinder.


2. The disabilities teacher wished good luck to all of his students. He did this by squirting the gourd. First, he lifted the gourd to his mouth. Second, he squeezed the gourd. Third, he squirted the gourd into his lips. In this way, the disabilities teacher prepared to wish good luck to all of his students by squirting the gourd.


3. The disabilities teacher student prepared to ask for each assessment criterion. He did this by washing each part of his face. First, he washed his eyes. Second, he washed his nose. Third, he washed his mouth. In this way, the disabilities teacher student prepared to ask for each assessment criterion by washing each part of his face.


4. The disabilities teacher student prepared to make a 3D model of an adjective describing a competency. He did this by washing the inside of the cylinder. First, he washed the inside of the base. Second, he washed the inside of the side. Third, he washed the inside of the top. In this way, the disabilities teacher student prepared to make a 3D model of an adjective describing a competency by washing the inside of the cylinder.


5. The disabilities teacher-student helped the self-preservation of a student. He did this by licking the ice-cream. First, he held the ice-cream by the cone. Second, he licked the ice-cream. Third, he licked the ice-cream until he had finished licking it. In this way, the disabilities teacher-student prepared to help the self-preservation of a student by licking the ice-cream.


6. The disabilities teacher student prepared to assess a “done-up” assignment (with a short story containing 64 departmental perspectives about it) and a “seen-as” version of “A” quality written by the student. He did this by placing the bird model in the hole. First, he lifted the bird model up. Second, he walked to the hole. Third, he placed it in the hole. In this way, the disabilities teacher student prepared to assess a “done-up” assignment and a “seen-as” version of “A” quality written by the student by placing the bird model in the hole.


7. The disabilities teacher-student tested that the gifted student had thought of five breasonings per idea (ideas with objects measured in the x, y and z dimensions, that a professor would think of as being like cleaning a test tube). He did this by bringing the bird model through the air to his desk. First, he lifted the bird model above his shoulder. Second, he walked to his desk. Third, he placed it on his desk. In this way, the disabilities teacher-student tested that the gifted student had thought of five breasonings per idea by bringing the bird model through the air to his desk.


8. The computational Hegelian programmed an example about intersubjectivity. He did this by pretending to fly home, like a bird. First, he stood up from his seat. Second, he raised and lowered his arms repeatedly, like a bird flying. Third, he walked forwards. In this way, the computational Hegelian programmed an example about intersubjectivity by pretending to fly home, like a bird.


9. The philosopher comparing normativity (judgments) with Hegel (intersubjectivity) wrote down the competencies of each subject. He did this by sewing the sheet over itself by 0.01 m. First, he threaded thread through the needle. Second, he positioned the needle at one end of the sheet. Third, he sewed the sheet over itself. In this way, the philosopher comparing normativity with Hegel wrote down the competencies of each subject by sewing the sheet over itself.


10. The Computational human rights philosopher (giving acts and prevention of omissions equal importance) gave both subsistence (acting) rights and security (prevention omissions) rights necessity scores of 10/10. He did this by mixing the apple and cream to put in the pie. First, he placed an apple in a bowl. Second, he put cream in a bowl. Third, he mixed the apple and cream together. In this way, the Computational human rights philosopher gave both subsistence (acting) rights and security (preventing omissions) rights necessity scores of 10/10 by mixing the apple and cream to put in the pie.


11. The philosopher comparing normativity (judgments) with the human rights philosopher (stating the distinction of acts and prevention of omissions is a mixture) tested that all the subjects’ duties (acts) and rights (prevention of omissions) were the same. He did this by separating the lettuce and tomato using a knife and spoon. First, he placed the lettuce and tomato on the plate. Second, he moved the lettuce to the left with the knife. Third, he moved the tomato to the right with the spoon. In this way, the philosopher comparing normativity (judgments) with the human rights philosopher (stating the distinction of acts and prevention of omissions is a mixture) tested that all the subjects’ duties (acts) and rights (prevention of omissions) were the same.  He did this by separating the lettuce and tomato using a knife and spoon.


12. The religious university union club speaker linked a student into a subject by thinking of an “A” (using the ideas from 6. and 7. above) about him. He did this by recognizing whose bedroom it was. First, he matched the sheet colour with that of his friend. Second, he matched the blanket cover colour with that of his friend. Third, he matched the wall colour with that of his friend. In this way, the religious university union club speaker linked a student into a subject by thinking of an “A” about him by recognizing whose bedroom it was.


13. The independent school student chose the best passages to write on. He did this by maintaining good posture to retain his heart health. First, he detected which way was up using his vestibular system. Second, he stood up. Third, he stood up straight. In this way, the independent school student chose the best passages to write on by maintaining good posture to retain his heart health.


14. The school student chose the sentences containing the key term from the question. She did this by reading the book of timetables. First, she selected the correct timetable from the book. Second, she selected the correct day from the timetable. Third, she selected the correct stop for the day from the timetable. In this way, the school student chose the sentences containing the key term from the question by reading the book of timetables.


15-21. Same as Rebreathsoning 15-21.


22.     The Asperger patient prepared to carry out a dissertation by rote memory, by using his body as a basis for a mnemonic for the essay structure.  He did this by sitting on a pious seat of right.  First, he walked to the seat.  Second, he lowered it.  Third, he sat on it.  In this way, the Asperger patient prepared to carry out a dissertation by rote memory, by using his body as a basis for a mnemonic the for essay structure by sitting on a pious seat of right.


23.     The competition of brains competitor defined a domain for an area of study by relating parts of an area of study to an object.  He did this by biting a biteful from the finger biscuit.  First, he took the biscuit from the packet.  Second, he bit it.  Third, he placed it in a plastic wrapper.  In this way, the competition of brains competitor defined a domain by relating parts of an area of study to an object by biting a biteful from the finger biscuit.


24. The simulatory problem solver invented a colour language (with rainbow inferences between words) that he simulated as starting thoughts for an area of study.  He did this by squeezing the gel onto his stomach.  First, he picked up the gel. Second, he squeezed it onto his stomach.  Third, he put it away.  In this way, the simulatory problem solver invented a colour language (with rainbow inferences between words) that he simulated as starting thoughts by squeezing the gel onto his stomach.


25. The brainworks participant wrote breasonings  (thought of X, Y and Z dimensions for objects) for a “seen-as” essay based directly on secondary literature, and handed in an essay of his design.  He did this by moving the arch from his toes.  First, he bent down.  Second, he put the arch over his toes.  Third, he removed the arch.  In this way, the brainworks participant wrote breasonings  (thought of X, Y and Z dimensions for objects) for a “seen-as” essay based directly on secondary literature, and handed in an essay of his design by moving the arch from his toes.


26. The students’ business program participant rotated the cutoff point in the argumentary circle, which he applied to different categories giving varying results.  For example, "The mother is in the family because the boy is in the family because the father is in the family" is modified so that the mother has a child who becomes a father, to test if there is a sex-linked disease which is present only in men.  He did this by connecting the street sign to the street number.  First, he went to the street.  Second, he read the street sign.  Third, he went to the house with the correct street number.  He did this by rotating the cutoff point in the argumentary circle, which he applied to different categories giving varying results, by connecting the street sign to the street number. 


27. The running captain loved people by removing mistakes.  He did this by squirting the carriage.  First, he took the hose cap off.  Second, he turned the tap on.  Third, he squirted the carriage.  In this way, the running captain loved people by removing mistakes by squirting the carriage.


28. The child carer took care of the child by tying up her shoelaces.  He did this by taking the finger biscuit out of the hat.  First, he placed the finger biscuit in the hat.  Second, he took it out.  Third, he ate it.  In this way, the child carer took care of the child by tying up her shoelaces by taking the finger biscuit out of the hat.


29. The intuitive computer shop employee wrote down a possible ‘A,' in other words, 85 breasonings (ideas with objects measured in the x, y and z dimensions.  A professor would think of the A as being like cleaning a test tube.  The A was for differing in opinion from mistakes about high-quality thoughts in an area of study of his design from the perspective of the lecturer-in-charge.  He did this by testing that he had cooked the artichoke.  First, he placed it on a plate.  Second, he positioned the knife on the artichoke.  Third, he cut the artichoke in half to test whether it was cooked.  In this way, the intuitive computer shop employee wrote down a possible ‘A,' in other words, 85 breasonings for finding fault with mistakes about high-quality thoughts in an area of study of his design from the perspective of the lecturer-in-charge by testing that he had cooked the artichoke.

Breasoning List Edit

1. chair, rice paper, tongue, rice, roll, stick


2. pram, gourd, mouth, squeezer, juice, tape measure


3. paper, face, eye, nose, teeth, star


4. apple, cylinder, double bass, sink, lid, tick mark


5. smiling face, ice-cream, cone, wafer (to test liquid has melted to its thinness, so can eat), spoon, jam


6. story book, hole, sparrow, trousers, street sign, sun-glasses


7. gift, dove, shoulder, desk, desk stand, paper plane


8. web, home, collapsible chair, arm, arrow, Hegel


9. gavel, sheet, thread, needle, ruler, normal distribution


10. human rights philosopher, apple, bowl, cream, whisk, abacus


11. cherry, lettuce, tomato, knife, spoon, research folder


12. hyperlink, bedroom, satin sheet, blanket cover, wall, mirror


13. passage, string, bubble balance, stand, metal tape measure


14. key, book, timetable, calendar, stop, question mark


15. pad, glove, finger, air object, shaker, cornerstone


16. pilot’s hat, vegan chicken sausage, ruler, metal spoon, skewer, teacup


17. tennis ball, skateboard, yard, horn, entrance, triangle


18. Napoleon’s hat, suit, t-shirt, singlet, coconut, game piece


19. raft, cabaña, match, wheel, sand timer, 3D axes


20. wig, bird, Japanese light, string, necklace, dress


21. cloth, path, tag, clothes line, vista, judge’s seat


22. rune, chair, beard, trousers, red pear, scarlet flower


23. square, biscuit, packet, teeth, plastic wrapper, biteful of lettuce


24. rainbow, gel, tube, stomach, cabinet, starting line


25. blueberry, arch, spoon, toe, sock, academy


26. circle, mother, street sign, street, street number, house


27. runners, hose, cap, tap, carriage, map


28. shoe lace, hat, finger, hat band, mouth, message


29. critique, artichoke, plate, knife, stick, hologram

Part of Room Essay Edit

What is the thesis statement?


I will argue for part of the room.


/*******


Prolog: What is a Part of a Room? Edit

Given part of room labels and stay data, the program returns the total time spent in each part of the room.  In more detail, given the room name, the map of the room (as a list of X, Y, parts of room tuple) and the time spent in the room (as a list of X, Y, seconds tuple), the program returns the map of the room with totals of time spent at each room part (as X, Y, part of room, seconds tuple).


The origin is in the northwest corner.


Input:


partofroom(


bedroom,[[0,0,""],[1,0,""],[2,0,door],


[0,1,bed],[1,1,next-to-robe],[2,1,robe],


[0,2,""],[1,2,""],[2,2,""]],       


[[2,0,1],[1,0,1],[1,1,100],[1,0,1],[2,0,1],


[2,0,1],[1,0,1],[0,0,1],[0,1,3000],[0,0,1],[1,0,1],[2,0,1]]).


Output:


[[0,0,[],2],[1,0,[],4],[2,0,door,4],[0,1,bed,3000],[1,1,next-to-robe,100],[2,1,robe,0],[0,2,[],0],[1,2,[],0],[2,2,[],0]]


Input:


partofroom(arkann-encyclopedia,[[0,0,table-of-contents],[1,0,glossary],[0,1,figures],[1,1,door]], [[1,1,1],[0,1,1500],[1,1,1],[1,1,1],[1,0,1500],[0,0,1500],[1,0,1],[1,1,1]]).


Output:


[[0,0,table-of-contents,1500],[1,0,glossary,1501],[0,1,figures,1500],[1,1,door,4]]


Input:


partofroom(arkann-exhibition,[[0,0,mayfair],[1,0,senior-arkann],[0,1,spaceship],[1,1,door]], [[1,1,1],[0,1,1500],[1,1,1],[1,1,1],[1,0,1500],[0,0,1500],[1,0,1],[1,1,1]]).


Output:


[[0,0,mayfair,1500],[1,0,senior-arkann,1501],[0,1,spaceship,1500],[1,1,door,4]]


Input:


partofroom(toy,[[0,0,fur],[1,0,security-blanket],[0,1,friend],[1,1,door]], [[1,1,1],[0,1,1500],[1,1,1],[1,1,1],[1,0,1500],[0,0,1500],[1,0,1],[1,1,1]]).


Output:


[[0,0,fur,1500],[1,0,security-blanket,1501],[0,1,friend,1500],[1,1,door,4]]


Input:


partofroom(emerald-trilogy,[[0,0,ship],[1,0,hidden-symbol],[0,1,treasure],[1,1,door]], [[1,1,1],[0,1,1500],[1,1,1],[1,1,1],[1,0,1500],[0,0,1500],[1,0,1],[1,1,1]]).


Output:


[[0,0,ship,1500],[1,0,hidden-symbol,1501],[0,1,treasure,1500],[1,1,door,4]]


*******/


partofroom(_Room,Map1,Times1) :- %% Returns the total time spent in each part of the room


sumtimes1(Times1,_Times2,Map1,[],Map2), write(Map2), !.


sumtimes1(Times1,Times2,Map1,Map2,Map3) :- %% The person’s time spent at each part of the room has been counted (whole path through parts of room)


Map1=[Part1|Parts],


Part1=[X,Y,RoomPartName],


sumtimes2(X,Y,Times1,[],Times3,0,Time),


Part2=[X,Y,RoomPartName,Time],


append(Map2,[Part2],Map4),


sumtimes1(Times3,Times2,Parts,Map4,Map3).


sumtimes1(Times,Times,[],Map,Map). %% The final leg of the person’s path has been counted (reason for connection between parts of room)


sumtimes2(X,Y,Times1,Times2,Times3,Time1,Time2) :- %% The leg time is added to the time spent at that part of the room (part of room)


Times1 = [Time4|Times4],


Time4 = [X,Y,Time3],


Time5 is Time1+Time3,


sumtimes2(X,Y,Times4,Times2,Times3,Time5,Time2),!.


sumtimes2(X1,Y1,Times1,Times2,Times3,Time1,Time2) :- %% Transfers the remaining path to be checked when it is not in the current part of the room (connection between parts of room)


Times1 = [Time3|Times4],


Time3 = [X2,Y2,_Time4],


(not(X1=X2); not(Y1=Y2)),


append(Times2,[Time3],Times5),


sumtimes2(X1,Y1,Times4,Times5,Times3,Time1,Time2).


sumtimes2(_X,_Y,[],Times,Times,Time,Time) :- !. %% The possible paths for the current part of room have been exhausted (reason for part of room)



Paragraph 1 - The final leg of the person’s path has been counted (reason for connection between parts of room) Edit

A: He did this by washing each part of his face - Figures to Table of Contents - look up figure in table of contents to read article about figure


B: He did this by washing the inside of the cylinder - Table of contents to glossary – check definition of term in table of contents because need to find object’s name


C: He did this by licking the ice cream. - Glossary to figures – look up glossary’s figure to check name’s object


D: He did this by lolling the rice paper cylinder with his tongue - Figures to Glossary – look up figure’s term in glossary to explain what figure is of


E: He did this by squirting the gourd - Table of contents to Figures – check parts of object (from table of contents) in figures


What is the objection to A?  


The subject couldn’t find the term “face” in the article title (where the subject washed each part of his face, after turning from the figures to the table of contents to look up a key term in a caption of a figure in the table of contents to read an article about the figure - on washing the face).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to A?  


The subject wrote the term “face” in the article title.


If agreeing, what is the connection between A or this rebuttal to A and the thesis statement or if disagreeing, what is the connection between the objection to A and the thesis statement?


Part of room is correct because of the washing of nature, which is correct because the subject wrote the term “face” in the article title.


What is the objection to B?


The subject couldn’t find the first point of two objects to compare (where the subject washed the inside of the cylinder, the appearance of which he needed to find by verifying the defined appearance of a name in the table of contents when he turned from the table of contents to glossary).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to B?


The subject defined the first point of each of the objects to compare whether they had the same shape.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to B and A?  


The subject wrote the term “face” in the article title, where the subject defined the first point of each of the words “face,” one that he copied and one that he had written, to compare whether they had the same shape.


What is the objection to C?


The subject didn’t have the confidence to look up the word screw because he didn’t know he needed to (where the subject tightened the screw, after turning from the glossary to the figure to look up the glossary’s figure of the screw because he needed to verify the appearance of the screw).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to C?


The subject looked up the word screw to tighten it.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to C and B?


The subject defined the first point of each of the instances of the word screw, one he had read and one he didn’t understand the meaning of, to compare whether they had the same shape, to tighten the screw.


What is the objection to D?


The subject failed to link the figure to its name (where the subject used water as an adhesive to close the rice paper cylinder like recognising the link between figure and name when turning from the figure to the glossary to look up the figure’s term in the glossary to explain what the figure depicts).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to D?


The subject drew a line from the name to the figure.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to D and A?


The subject wrote the term “face” in the article title and drew a line from the word “face” to a diagram of the face.


What is the objection to E?


The subject didn’t know what a gourd was (where the subject squirted water from the gourd, and the water was verified to be constituted in the gourd, from the table of contents, in the figures when turning from the table of contents to the figures).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to E?  


The subject looked up the gourd in the figures.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to E and D?


The subject looked up the gourd in the figures and then drew a line from the name “gourd” to the figure of one.


Paragraph 2 – The subject adds the leg time to the time spent in that part of the room (part of room) Edit

A: He did this by placing the bird model in the hole - map


B: He did this by mixing the apple and cream to put in the pie - access


C: He did this by sewing the sheet over itself by 0.01 m - activity manifest


D: He did this by pretending to fly home, like a bird - object


E: He did this by bringing the bird model through the air to his desk - object manifest


What is the objection to A?


The subject chose the wrong angle on the compass while orienteering (where the subject placed the bird model in the hole according to the orienteering map).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to A?


The subject accurately chose the correct angle to travel by using the compass and ruler to draw lines on the map.


If agreeing, what is the connection between A or this rebuttal to A and the thesis statement or if disagreeing, what is the connection between the objection to A and the thesis statement?


Part of room is correct because of the navigation of nature, which is correct because the subject accurately chose the correct angle to travel by using the compass and ruler to draw lines on the map.


What is the objection to B?  


The subject couldn’t hold the spoon without hands (where the subject mixed the apple and cream to put in the pie while using his amputated arms to access the spoon in the bowl).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to B?


The subject used an arm attachment, which he set to grip the spoon.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to B and A?  


The subject accurately chose the correct angle to travel by using the compass and ruler to draw lines on the map because the subject used an arm attachment, which he set to grip the pen and a clamp set up by an assistant to grip the ruler.


What is the objection to C?


The subject couldn’t find the sheet to sew a fold in (where the subject sewed the sheet over itself by 0.01 m as part of an activity manifest to make and sew the sheet’s edge over).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to C?


The subject found the sheet in the fabric cupboard.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to C and B?  


The subject used an arm attachment, which he set to grip the sheet, which he found in the fabric cupboard.


What is the objection to D?


The subject didn’t have enough energy to walk home (where the subject acted out flying home, which was the object, like a bird).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to D?


The subject ate a meal before departing for home.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to D and A?


The subject accurately chose the correct angle to travel by using the compass and ruler to draw lines on the map after eating a meal before departing for home.


What is the objection to E?


The subject collided with an object on his path (where the subject brought the bird model through the air, manifested with objects, to his desk).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to E?  


The subject circumnavigated the obstacle.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to E and D?


The subject ate a meal before departing for home before circumnavigating an obstacle on his path.


Paragraph 3 – The possible paths for the current part of room have been exhausted (reason for part of room) Edit

A: She did this by reading the book of timetables - treasure hunt


B: He did this by recognising whose bedroom it was - disabilities sufferers treated equally


C: He did this by separating the lettuce and tomato using a knife and spoon - synthesis of activities


D: He did this by maintaining good posture to retain his heart health - interobject synthesis


E: He did this by shaking his hand in the air - robot replaces universal object


What is the objection to A?  


The subject couldn’t find a train that stopped where the treasure was (where the subject read the book of timetables to complete the treasure hunt).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to A?


The subject found a train that stopped where the treasure was.


If agreeing, what is the connection between A or this rebuttal to A and the thesis statement or if disagreeing, what is the connection between the objection to A and the thesis statement?


Part of room is correct because of the stationisation of nature, which is correct because the subject found a train that stopped where the treasure was.


What is the objection to B?  


The disabilities sufferers weren’t treated equally when they could recognise whose bedroom it was (where the disabilities sufferers intended to recognise whose bedroom it was). 


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to B?  


The disabilities sufferers were treated equally because they could recognise whose bedroom it was.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to B and A?  


The subject found a train that stopped where the treasure was, outside the bedroom where the disabilities sufferers were treated equally because they could recognise whose bedroom it was.


What is the objection to C?


The subject dropped the tomato from the table when moving it with the spoon (where the subject moved the lettuce and tomato using a knife and spoon respectively, in a synthesis of activities, which was separating the lettuce and tomato). 


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to C?


The subject took care not to move the tomato too close to the edge of the table when moving it with a spoon.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to C and B?  


The disabilities sufferers were treated equally because they could recognise whose bedroom it was when they took care not to turn their eyes too close to the edge of the bedroom owner’s name label.


What is the objection to D?


The subject put pressure on his heart and lungs by not maintaining good posture (where the subject maintained good posture to retain his heart health by keeping his head above his body in an interobject synthesis).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to D?  


The subject maintained a straight posture to assist his heart health.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to D and A?  


The subject found a train that made a straight line to the treasure, like maintaining straight posture to assist his heart health.


What is the objection to E?  


The subject walked into the objects on stands, which the robot had replaced the air with (where the subject shook his hand in the air, which the robot may replace with a universal object).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to E?  


The subject removed the stands with objects on them to clear a path.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to E and D?


The subject maintained a straight posture to assist his heart health like walking along a straight path, where the subject removed the stands with objects on them to clear a path.


Paragraph 4 – The program transfers the remaining path to be checked when it is not in the current part of the room (connection between parts of room) Edit

A: He did this by testing whether he was a man or a woman - door bed – go to bed


B: He did this by driving someone up to the door in a tricycle - door robe – get coat


C: He did this by pulling the model bird - bed next-to-robe – change clothes


D: He did this by cooking three hundred and sixty degrees of the cabaña - door next-to-robe – try on garment


E: She did this by stabbing a sausage - next-to-robe robe – put away skivvy


What is the objection to A?  


The subject tripped over the bedspread when getting into bed (where the subject tested whether he was a man or a woman when he walked from the door to the bed to go to bed by determining that she liked the feminine bedspread).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to A?  


The subject avoided the bedspread when getting into bed.


If agreeing, what is the connection between A or this rebuttal to A and the thesis statement or if disagreeing, what is the connection between the objection to A and the thesis statement?


Part of room is correct because of the part-of-room-transitionism of nature, which is correct because the subject avoided the bedspread when getting into bed.


What is the objection to B?  


The attendant lost the coat (where the subject drove the client to the door before an attendant got the coat at the door and placed it on the stand).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to B?  


The attendant labelled the subject’s coat.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to B and A?  


The subject avoided the bedspread when getting into bed because the subject labelled the subject’s coat.


What is the objection to C?


The subject couldn’t remove the jacket because it was too tight (where the subject pulled the model bird like pulling the jacket’s zip down after moving from the bed to next to the wardrobe to change clothes).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to C?


The subject wore a jacket that he could take off.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to C and B?  


The attendant labelled the subject’s coat which he could take off.


What is the objection to D?


The subject couldn’t see his back in the mirror (where the subject cooked three hundred and sixty degrees of the vegan cabaña, like twirling through three hundred and sixty degrees of a circle with the garment that he was trying on in the mirror after walking from the door to next to the wardrobe).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to D?  


The subject used two mirrors to see his back.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to D and A?  


The subject avoided the bedspread when getting into bed by using two mirrors to see his back.


What is the objection to E?  


The subject couldn’t find a hook for the skivvy (where the subject stabbed a sausage, like putting away a skivvy, after walking from next to the wardrobe to the wardrobe).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to E?  


The subject hung the skivvy on a rail instead.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to E and D?


The subject used two mirrors to see behind him, where he hung the skivvy on a rail.


Paragraph 5 – The person’s time spent at each part of the room has been counted (whole path through parts of room) Edit

A: He did this by lifting himself up onto a ledge - arkann-exhibition – language divergence


B: He did this by squeezing the gel onto his stomach - toy – making a friend


C: He did this by biting a biteful from the finger biscuit - emerald-trilogy – find treasure


D: He did this by sitting on a pious seat of right - Arkann-Encyclopedia – body performance


E: He did this by moving the arch from his toes - Bedroom - rest body


What is the objection to A?  


The subject couldn’t understand the translations for the name of the object (where the subject lifted himself up onto a ledge by working out the conclusion common to the languages deriving from language divergence in the Arkann exhibition).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to A?  


The subject computed the names of the object using a logical induction program (with the rule to identify a common name from illustrations).


If agreeing, what is the connection between A or this rebuttal to A and the thesis statement or if disagreeing, what is the connection between the objection to A and the thesis statement?


Part of room is correct because of the recognition of nature, which is correct because the subject computed the names of the object using a logical induction program (with the rule to identify a common name from illustrations).


What is the objection to B?


The subject failed to distribute gel uniformly over the patient’s stomach (where the subject squeezed the gel onto the stomach of a patient to be sonar scanned with by a machine).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to B?  


The subject distributed gel uniformly over the patient’s stomach.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to B and A?


The logical induction program identified a common name from illustrations like traversing a uniformly distributed gel on the patient’s stomach.


What is the objection to C?


The subject choked on the biscuit treasure (where the truth value that the subject bit a biteful from the finger biscuit equalled one, like the truth value that the subject found the treasure, in the Emerald Trilogy).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to C?


The subject carefully ate the biscuit treasure.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to C and B?  


The subject distributed gel uniformly over the subject’s biscuit treasure to carefully eat it.


What is the objection to D?


The subject fell off the seat (where the subject sat on a pious seat of the right to demonstrate body performance like that the subject tested in the Arkann Encyclopedia).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to D?


The subject sat on the seat properly.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to D and A?  


The subject identified the centre of the seat from an illustration and sat on it properly.


What is the objection to E?


The subject couldn’t remove the arch shoes from his feet (where the subject moved the arch from his toes to rest his body in the bedroom).


If agreeing (optional) or disagreeing, what is the objection to E?


The subject eased his shoes from his feet.


What is the connection between these rebuttals to E and D?


The subject eased his shoes from his feet to sit on the seat at bedtime properly.



Select the order of paragraphs: Edit

A: 5 - The subject computed the names of the object using a logical induction program (with the rule to identify a common name from illustrations). - shelves


B: 2 - The subject accurately chose the correct angle to travel by using the compass and ruler to draw lines on the map. - table


C: 1 - The subject wrote the term “face” in the article title. - desk


D: 4 - The subject avoided the bedspread when getting into bed. - bed


E: 3 - The subject found a train that stopped where the treasure was. - children’s train station



What is the connection between the paragraphs B and A?  The subject computed the names of the object using a logical induction program (with the rule to identify a common name from illustrations) where the named object was found by choosing the correct angle to travel by using the compass and ruler to draw lines on the map.


What is the connection between the paragraphs C and B?  The subject accurately chose the correct angle to draw by using the compass and ruler to draw the lines of the face after writing the term “face” in the article title.


What is the connection between the paragraphs D and A?  The subject computed the name of the bedspread using a logical induction program (with the rule to identify the bedspread from illustrations) to avoid the bedspread when getting into bed.


What is the connection between the paragraphs E and D?  The subject avoided the bedspread when getting into bed after finding a train that stopped where the bed was.